Request Line: (870) 277-1080 [email protected]
Text GIVE2KLEK to 8445447171 LEARN MORE
In this Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019 photo, father Roy Snipes, pastor of the La Lomita Chapel, shows Associated Press journalists the land on either side of the Rio Grande at the US-Mexico border in Mission, Texas. Portions of Father Snipes' church land in Mission could be seized by the federal government to construct additional border wall and fence lines. Rather than surrender their land to the federal government, some property owners on the Texas border are digging in to fight President Donald Trump's border wall. They are rejecting buyout offers and preparing to battle the administration in court. Trump is scheduled to travel to the border Thursday to make the case for his $5.7 billion wall. (AP Photo/John L. Mone)

In this Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019 photo, father Roy Snipes, pastor of the La Lomita Chapel, shows Associated Press journalists the land on either side of the Rio Grande at the US-Mexico border in Mission, Texas. Portions of Father Snipes’ church land in Mission could be seized by the federal government to construct additional border wall and fence lines. Rather than surrender their land to the federal government, some property owners on the Texas border are digging in to fight President Donald Trump’s border wall. They are rejecting buyout offers and preparing to battle the administration in court. Trump is scheduled to travel to the border Thursday to make the case for his $5.7 billion wall. (AP Photo/John L. Mone)

As President Donald Trump travels to the border in Texas to make the case for his $5.7 billion wall, landowner Eloisa Cavazos says she knows firsthand how the project will play out if the White House gets its way. The federal government has started surveying land along the border in Texas and announced plans to start construction next month. Rather than surrender their land, some property owners are digging in, vowing to reject buyout offers and preparing to fight the administration in court.

“You could give me a trillion dollars and I wouldn’t take it,” said Cavazos, whose land sits along the Rio Grande, the river separating the U.S. and Mexico in Texas. “It’s not about money.”

Trump visited McAllen, a city of 143,000 on the river, on Thursday. Congress in March funded 33 miles (53 kilometers) of walls and fencing in Texas. The government has laid out plans that would cut across private land in the Rio Grande Valley. Those in the way include landowners who have lived in the valley for generations, environmental groups and a 19th century chapel. Many have hired lawyers who are preparing to fight the government if, as expected, it moves to seize their land through eminent domain.

The opposition will intensify if Democrats accede to the Trump administration’s demand to build more than 215 new miles of wall, including 104 miles in the Rio Grande Valley and 55 miles near Laredo. Even a compromise solution to build “steel slats,” as Trump has suggested, or more fencing of the kind that Democrats have previously supported would likely trigger more court cases and push-back in Texas. Legal experts say Trump likely cannot waive eminent domain — which requires the government to demonstrate a public use for the land and provide landowners with compensation — by declaring a national emergency.

Original article source: http://aurn.com/texas-land-owners-ready-to-fight-trump-on-border-wall/ | Article may or may not reflect the views of KLEK 102.5 FM or The Voice of Arkansas Minority Advocacy Council

Pin It on Pinterest